Residents of Georgia and those considering citizenship might be interested in knowing about the Oath of Allegiance, a step that needs to be completed in the naturalization process. Immigration judges or others may administer the Oath of Allegiance.

According to U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services, completion of the naturalization process requires the oath. The beginning of the oath renounces allegiance to another country, state or sovereignty; this means that the person is no longer a citizen of another country, especially the one from which he came.

The next part speaks of defending the Constitution and laws of the United States against foreign and domestic enemies. He or she will have faith and allegiance to this country. They promise to fight for the United States when lawfully required, such as joining the Armed Forces, not necessarily in combat, and performing civilian duties as the law requires. The oath finishes with the person swearing that he or she is taking the oath freely.

It is given in English whether or not the person has a waiver. They may have a translator with them to translate during the ceremony. Because of religious preferences, the person may request a modification of the words “under God” if they are unwilling to use those words. An oath waiver may be requested when a person is not able to understand what the oath means.

Those who have a title of nobility must renounce that title, such as prince, duchess, etc., to adhere to the Constitution. This must be in a public ceremony, and USCIS must record it.

Before a person takes the oath of allegiance for citizenship, they might need help with a green card, officially known as a Permanent Resident Card. A knowledgeable attorney versed in immigration law might be of valuable assistance on a person’s path to becoming a citizen.