In Georgia, many people need help applying for United States citizenship. This application is a detailed process administered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). First, there are preconditions, then an application, interview, and if those are passed, citizenship.

Before applying, potential citizens meet several prerequisites. They must be 18 years or older with a green card and be a lawful permanent resident for five years (with some exceptions). They need to have less than one year spent physically outside the U.S., no primary home outside the U.S., and live in Georgia for three months. Applicants must have “good moral character”, read, write, and speak English, pass a test about U.S. history and government, and swear to the ideals of the U.S. Constitution and loyalty to the U.S.

Next, they fill out the application, including backing photocopies, and any application fee. USCIS wants to understand immigration history, including every trip outside the U.S. An applicant needs documents backing all travels, including reasons for travel. Do not lie. The penalty for lying or fraud is revoking the green card and deportation.

From here it may be months before USCIS replies, setting up appointments for fingerprinting and an interview. The interview is the last big step and is a critical part of the application process. Upon passing the interview, the next step is the swearing-in ceremony. After swearing an oath, the new citizen gets a certificate of naturalization.

The application is long and detailed. Many people need help keeping everything in order and providing the right evidence for all the requirements. Citizenship lawyers may provide valuable guidance and make sure the application is filled out correctly.